Christian's Worship

WorshipChristians assemble for communal worship on Sunday, the day of the resurrection, though other liturgical practices often occur outside this setting. Scripture readings are drawn from the Old and New Testaments, but especially the Gospels. Often these are arranged on an annual cycle, using a book called a lectionary. Instruction is given based on these readings, called a sermon, or homily. There are a variety of congregational prayers, including thanksgiving, confession, and intercession, which occur throughout the service and take a variety of forms including recited, responsive, silent, or sung.

The Lord's Prayer, or Our Father, is regularly prayed.

Some Christian denominations view communion as indicating those who are already united in the church, restricting participation to their members not in a state of mortal sin. Most other churches view communion as a means to unity, rather than an end, and invite all Christians or even anyone to participate. In some denominations, participation is decided by prior arrangement with a church leader.
Some Evangelical services resemble concerts with rock and pop music, dancing, and use of multimedia. For groups which do not recognize priesthood distinct from ordinary believers the services are generally lead by a minister, preacher, or pastor. Still others may lack any formal leaders, either in principle or by local necessity.
Worship can be varied for special events like baptisms or weddings in the service or significant feast days. In the early church Christians and those yet to complete initiation would separate for the Eucharistic part of the worship. In many churches today, adults and children will separate for all or some of the service to receive age-appropriate teaching. Such children's worship is often called Sunday school or Sabbath school.

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